Border hopping, Mexico to Guatemala to Mexico.

imageA friend from Iowa City, some time in Germany, lived in Mexico City for a while, in Chile currently- we met in California- has Guatemalan roots and says she’ll be visiting there for a few days. I’m some muddled mix of European gringo roots, am in Mexico, and that’s close enough to arrange meeting up. Slightly too far to bike in time, which is maybe a blessing after seeing the mountains between San Cristobal and Guatemala City. So instead Ace gets stashed in a hostel in Mexico, and I jump on a few buses. There and back in a few days- fast transit! Ximena, good to see you!

imageThat border crossing. Full of money changers and street vendors selling every type of clothing or knick-knack you might want.

imageThat bus- first class! I.e. what only tourists take.

imageAnd back to Mexico!

To San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico.

Pros: hit a reasonably good wind gap through the Isthmus, buffeted only a little by sidewinds that died down in the afternoon. Lucky. And that same day was flagged down on the road by a WarmShowers host (warmshowers.org, CouchSurfing for touring cyclists), then welcomed into a home for the night. Anyone passing through Zanatepec should look up Rodrigo’s and Lupita’s house, just follow the signs literally painted onto the highway or ask anyone in town.

Cons: struck by first bout of sickness just before crossing the isthmus, but luckily only spent one day emptying my guts everywhere. After witnessing one such episode, a kind woman, Margarita, at a comedor taught me the local word for soup (caldo) and let me crash there for the afternoon and night. Thankful.

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The Oaxaca to San Cristobal route is bounded on both sides by mountains. First, descend from Oaxaca City down to the coast, exiting the Sierra Madre Sur mountain range. Cue heat and hammock country.

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Standing water- long time no see.

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Mountainous treetops to dry lowlands, where shade has even higher value. Note background windmills- a cautionary sign for cyclists, and even drivers here. Winds sometimes blow strongly enough to toss over tractor-trailers.

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Though the grazing cattle seem to pay the wind no mind.

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And once the stomach had recovered…

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Scenery changes.

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Entering Chiapas sees an immediate shift in road graffiti, nearly all taking on a religious message. San Cristobal de las Casas sits up at 7200′, so getting there involves a roughly 7000′ climb from the lowlands to the surrounding mountains. There are two routes to choose from, the new toll road that does the climb in ~40km, or the old highway that winds through small indigenous villages for a slightly longer 65km. I took the old highway, and even starting early in the morning, didn’t get to San Cristobal until late afternoon. A good climb, great for the appetite!

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From one set of mountains to the next: welcome the Sierra Madre de Chiapas!

Update from Oaxaca, Mexico.

After a roundabout detour from Mexico City northwest to Queretaro and then San Miguel De Allende, now headed south again. After a good rest in Oaxaca, time to be back on the road soon. Some pics of the last stretch of the ride.

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The old highway from Queretaro to San Miguel de Allende. Google lists this route only under hiking directions, which were fairly accurate, until I either missed a turn or the road just disappeared and I ended up in the middle of a farmer’s cornfield. He was a little surprised to see me there, but gave me directions down a network of driveways back to the actual road.

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Cobblestone practice. Fatbike time?

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San Miguel de Allende. Hometown of Ignacio Allende, one of the important leaders of Mexico’s independence from Spain. Another beautiful colonial center, one of many such towns in this part of central Mexico.

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Also in San Miguel: lots of murals.

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Cyclist fuel: carnitas, salsas, Coca-Cola. Mexico’s pretty alright.

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Onto some smaller roads through the mountains from San Miguel, crossing from the state of Guanajuato through Morelia to Queretaro back to the State of Mexico. The State of Mexico is more or less a high plain, surrounded all around by mountains.

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An abundance of camping spots.

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Entering into Toluca, capitol of the State of Mexico.

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Some company for a few kilometers, Pino, Rafael, and David, all out for a ride.

Right off the free highway to Oaxaca City. Smaller than the toll highway, and longer, but beautiful winding up along the pines and oaks before descending into the city. More mountains, more camping spots, just watch out for the cacti. Note: cyclists in Mexico are allowed on the toll highways for free, just ride around the toll booths and ignore the “no bicycles” signs. This is the Mexican way.

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So much goodness to eat in Oaxaca. Pastries abound in the bakeries, if it has a fruit filling it’s generally a pineapple jam, delicious. Try too the tejate, a corn and cocoa drink, cold and filling. Walk around in all the markets, some open everyday, others, such as the big one in nearby Tlacolula, only held on Sundays, though even on off days there will be some vendors in a few of the stalls.

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Or maybe just buy a slab of raw meat and sweet onions, which will then be immediately grilled in front of you. Good to go with friends.

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Aussie Cam takes over grilling duties.

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Oaxaca is also known for its traditional crafts. Teotitlan is a nearby center of Zapotec weaving, local sheep’s wool is made into thread and dyed with the area plants, to be woven into beautiful rugs or clothing, of every color, shape, and design.

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Will from Oakland on rug hunt.

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Oaxaca City center by night. Great place to grab a bite to eat, people watch. Great city to relax in, but hard to leave. Hostel Azul Cielo just a few blocks from the center a great base. Next up, just gotta get across the dreaded Isthmus, where Mexico is squeezed between the Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico. Winds are rumored to be quite strong at times…

Queretaro, Mexico. A long-awaited home visit.

Outside of the Sheep Mountain visitor center up in Yukon, Canada, a couple came over and started chatting. They’re from Mexico, and invited me to their home once I made it that far. I finally got there last week, to Queretaro, Mexico, a city northeast of Mexico City, with a beautiful colonial center. Here’s what we looked like, then and now.

Day 20, July 2013:
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Day 198, January 2014:
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Thanks Irene and Chris for having me!

Mexico City; DF

A rest, here, for 5 days, the first actual rest in Mexico. Anonymity in the enormous city, in the hostel too, Ace hides in a safe place on the roof so to everyone else at the hostel I’m just some scraggly bearded American wearing the same clothes over and over. Which we’re all doing but rain pants and a cycling cap, what’s with that bro?

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I’m here with Daniel, below, who biked across the US last year and just graduated from Ohio State, moving to Sacramento soon to start working with AmeriCorps. Thanks for coming to visit!
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We spend the days touring the city, eating, playing cards. This city is epic, so much character, so much to do. We stayed in the city center by the Zocalo, the central plaza.

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Coyoacan lies south of the city center. It’s a beautiful colonial center, where Cortes originally built his home until problems with the Aztecs forced him to move back to their part of the city. There are big indoor markets here, street artists outside, cobblestones and elaborate churches. Also apparently an extremely popular coffee shop, just look for the place where everyone -everyone- is walking away from with a take-out cup decorated in the red, white, and green of the Mexican flag. Frida Kahlo’s home, the Blue House, it too is in Coyoacan as well. The house is a kind of contradiction, vibrantly painted, visually beautiful, but the artwork and the history of Frida inside bears witness to the pain and struggle of her life.

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Coyoacan, colonial, elegant.

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Then there’s Xochimilco, south-southwest of the center. The area is full of canals, upon which people rent long, flat boats and are paddled around for an hour or two or three, perfect for a little fiesta on the water. Mariachi bands and food vendors float around on boats of their own, entertaining, feeding.

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Festive.

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And a day tour to Puebla, a colonial city to the west of the city famed for its churches. Here, the Chapel of the Rosario, was deemed the eighth wonder of the Old World when completed in the 17th century, due to its ornateness. Every surface inside covered with gold gilding, unbelievable.
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Old World charm in the New World.

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More, on top of the world, the view from the Pyramid of Cholula, third largest pyramid in the world. Although the Spanish built a church on top of the pyramid, and now the pyramid itself is a tad overgrown with grass and trees, so from many angles tends to resemble a large hill.

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Other pyramids, in Teotihuacan. We stand atop the Pyramid of the Moon, the Pyramid of the Sun in the background left. Pyramid of the Sun = 7th largest pyramid in the world.

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Not to be missed, anywhere in Mexico, are the panaderias. All of these bakeries, phenomenal! Variety in opulence, from sugar-cookies to the Mexican conchas, those balls of soft enriched dough with a hardened sugar coating resembling a sea-shell, to cake “popsicles”, to whole wheat biscuits with a light chocolate coating. We did our due diligence tasting as many as we could…

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Yes please…

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Save room for dessert… Or maybe midday snack?

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Some of the best whole wheat pastries ever. So filling, and so tasty. Those rectangles in the background? Perfect for soon-to-be-less-hungry cyclists.

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Also, our favorite quesadilla stand in the city. Figuring out the Mexican eating times has taken a little while. Many street food stands are open starting late morning until the evening, but promptly close at 5 or 6. The Mexicans favor a more substantial lunch and a (much later) lighter dinner, not exactly the American schedule.

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Eating well in Mexico, check.

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But not everything is fun and games and food. A week or two ago some leaf-cutter ants visited me and the tent one night. Apparently they have a taste for tent mesh, so the inner layer of my tent now has quite a few holes and tears. A morning spent sewing up the worst offenses, productive, though now portions of the mesh look like there are giant spiders crawling up the sides. Quite a sight to wake go to. But so far it’s still usable, so that’s that.

Photos; Northeast Mexico

From the border to the metropolis. Tamaulipas to San Luis Potosi to Hidalgo to El Estado De Mexico. The Mexican people are friendly, always. Sometimes boys in town will ride alongside me for a ways, men wave and smile, though older women tend to shuffle past, studiously ignoring my strangeness. The landscape changes, desert, mountain, city, it’s all here.

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Sweeping downhills, after the sweaty uphills.

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Crossing the Tropic of Cancer.

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Framebag life.

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In a Catholic country, I tip my hat to every roadside shrine in hopes of making it to the next one safely.

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Shrimp lunch, dodging the afternoon heat, $6.

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Sugar cane, by the truckload. We both climb hills at nearly the same speed.

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Mountain life.

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Pedestrian walkway that Ace and I are just a bit too wide for.

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Host, Hipolito, in Matlapa.

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Tortilleria Lupita, Matlapa. The smell of fresh tortillas in every town ranks highly on the list of good things about Mexico.

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Urban single track.

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Aptly named hills.

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Perched on the edge, winding from town to town.

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Among the cacti and the rocks.

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Representing some of the best of Mexico: tacos and Coca-Cola. And the ever-present salsas, ranging from hot to fiery. Quite dangerous to sun-chapped lips.

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And other dinners, cooked on my tiny alcohol stove. Finding camping spots has rarely been a problem. Those out of sight are best, though cacti and spiky vines tend to imply that the ground will be littered with thorns. My inflatable mattress pad loses a noticeable amount of air during the night by now, though for being older than I am it’s doing pretty good. Plus, the less comfortable it is in the morning, the more likely I am to get moving sooner.

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Part of the town square in Tizayuca. Wall murals and brightly painted buildings exist everywhere here. Whatever else it may be, Mexico is certainly a pretty country.

Safely in Mexico City

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Who needs the hassle of dodging buses and taxis when you can ride in a bike party instead? Outside of Tizayuca, I met a group of cyclists heading to the Basilica de Guadalupe in the center of Mexico City. 120 riders on a pilgrimage, almost entirely riding single speeds with those flared out moustache handlebars. Great to ride in a pack in a city, especially this packed city.

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Here for a few days with Daniel. Time for tacos, panaderias, and more.

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